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Health Information Management: A Critical Part of Health Care

From March 22-28, a spotlight will shine on the unsung heroes of healthcare during Health Information Professionals Week. This week celebrates health information management professionals who leverage the most current technology to maintain, organize and secure important patient data and other medical information across the healthcare industry.

What does it mean to be a health information technology manager?

Health information management professionals work in a variety of job settings, serving as an intersection between clinical, operational and administrative functions. They impact every phase of the patient care process – from admissions to diagnosis and treatment through healthcare information management. Common health information management career roles include:

·       Director

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A Brief History of Phlebotomy

Today, we know that phlebotomy is the practice of opening a vein by incision or puncture to remove blood or introduce fluid as therapeutic treatment or part of the diagnosis. Originally, around 2000 B.C., it was known as bloodletting.Bloodletting – the draining of blood from a patient – was thought to cure a vast array of ailments, ranging from the plague to acne.

Bloodletting in ancient times

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Spring Allergens: Nothing to Sneeze at

Spring Allergens: Nothing to Sneeze at

The grass is greening, flower buds are opening, and your allergies are awakening. It’s the season of spring, or the season of suffering for those who react adversely to the major allergens springing up this time of year.

What are allergies?

An allergy is a disproportionate reaction in the immune system to substances in the environment. These substances don’t cause a reaction in most people, but for the allergic, symptoms such as sneezing, headaches, breathing problems and runny noses are common. Spring allergies are caused by particular allergens unique to this season.

Pollen

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Ebola: Learn the Facts

History of the Disease

Ebola is a rare and deadly viral disease that originated in Africa around 1976. Named after the Ebola River, the virus first appeared in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks: one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo, which is located near the Ebola River.

The natural host of the Ebola virus is thought to be fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family. Ebola is introduced to the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals that include chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead in the rainforest.

Ebola then can spread from human to human through direct contact with blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people as well as contact with surfaces and materials contaminated with these fluids.

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Blood: Your Body's Fuel

If the human heart is the engine of our bodies, blood is the oxygenated fuel keeping everything moving, from our brain to our feet. This is why blood donation is a great way to honor the awareness of heart health during American Heart Month in February, because without its fuel, your heart can’t take you anywhere.

Blood Facts

1. Fact:One pint of donated blood equals three lives saved.

2. Fact: Sold on the open market, donated blood brings in $4.5 billion annually.

3. Fact: It would take 1,200,000 blood-sucking mosquitoes, each mosquito sucking once, to drain the average human body of its blood supply.

4. Fact: For each pint of donated blood there are 13 tests performed. 11 of these tests are for infectious diseases.

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Be Your Own Heart Hero

This February, Medtech is honoring American Heart Month with its “Heart Heroes” campaign that challenges you to be your own best heart health advocate. The American Heart Association sponsors American Hearth Month each February to promote awareness of cardiovascular disease. American Heart Month spotlights heart health, heart disease prevention and how to maintain a healthy heart for a healthy life. Click here to donate to the American Heart Association.

Cardiovascular disease: the bad guy

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Better Education - New Year's Resolutions

Maybe your New Year’s Resolution isn’t centered on health-related goals, but instead your resolution is focused on your studies and overall education. When it comes to your education, you get out of it what you put into it and we want you to get the most out of your time at Medtech. That’s why we’ve compiled a few tips to help you stay focused and successful.   

Manage your Time

Have you ever planned to study for a few hours and at the end of the day you realize somehow you didn’t study enough? It’s time to kick the habit of procrastination. By managing your time, minimizing both distractions and procrastination you will find yourself being significantly more productive.

Ask Questions in Class

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Should You Get Vaccinated?

Vaccines are a marvel of modern medicine, offering cures for everything from the newest strains of influenza to once-devastating diseases like smallpox and measles – so it’s a wonder that they’ve come under so much scrutiny as of late. If you’re trying to make an educated decision about vaccines and whether they’re right for you and your children, keep reading. We’re about to provide some basic information that can help you make up your mind.

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Eat Healthy - New Year's Resolutions

Now that your “Get Fit” New Year’s Resolution is under way, we want to encourage you to keep up on your health. At Medtech, we believe that your eating habits are an important step in fulfilling your resolution. Try out the S.M.A.R.T. goal method by following the tips below and start taking care of your body.

Track and Plan

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Vaccines: The Past, Present and Future

When the nurse cleans off your arm with an alcohol swab and says “this won’t hurt a bit,” you probably aren’t thinking about the incredible significance of the vaccine you’re about to receive. Truth be told, vaccines represent the pinnacle of almost a century of innovation in modern medicine – innovations that help save lives.

Early vaccine pioneers

Sickness has plagued humankind for centuries. Diseases like whooping cough, measles, smallpox, polio, rabies, cholera and many more have caused thousands of deaths around the world. Up until the 19th and 20th centuries, physicians had very few options when it came to fighting and preventing the transmission and spread of these diseases.  

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